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Protect free speech: Don’t mess with Texas’ anti-SLAPP law

by | Apr 27, 2023 | Opinion

When it comes to criticizing the powerful or politically connected, the First Amendment protects the little guy. No matter who you are or how much money you have in the bank, you have the right to speak your mind.

Because our founders knew all too well the danger of granting the government the power to decide who can and cannot speak, the First Amendment was designed to shield speakers from government retribution.

By Will Creely, legal director of the Foundation for Individual Rights and Expression.

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